July 2019

July 5, 2019

‘Serengeti’ – A Look into BBC’s New Documentary

A male lion with the red glow of a sunset behind him in the heart of the Serengeti.

For those who tuned into BBC1 at 8pm last Thursday, you will have witnessed the start of a series that transports you from your armchair to the rolling plains of the Serengeti. There you will witness the battle that the Serengeti’s best known animals face. Each day is a struggle between life and death and although it is great to watch these events unfold on television, there is nothing better than seeing these spectacles first hand. Whether it is the lions, the elephants or the wild dogs that spark an interest for you to go on safari or a love of wildlife, it doesn’t matter. After organising luxury safaris for over twenty years, we know the best places for you visit! Read below for our honest advice about where the best places are to see these magnificent animals.  

Wildebeest Migration

The world-renowned Great Migration is a year-round event that occurs within the Serengeti National Park. Each year millions of wildebeest and zebra follow the rains in a clock-wise motion clocking up about two-hundred and fifty kilometres each. From crossing the Mara River in the North to giving birth on the Ndutu plains in the South, drama is never far away when watching these ungulates. If you’re particularly interested in keeping up with the migration, then we would whole-heartedly recommend a mobile camp. These are tented camps that follow the migration all year, moving from site to site meaning that they have the best spots for the action. Do not fear though, luxury isn’t compromised. All your amenities (and more) are certainly apparent.

One of the greatest wildlife spectacles on Earth – The Great Wildebeest Migration

Lions

The majestic King of the Jungle is probably the most sought after animal people want to see when they go on safari. Luckily, lions are everywhere in the Serengeti and unlike the wildebeest, they stick to their territories. Whilst the migration may pass through areas at different times of the year, no matter where you stay there will be plenty of resident game in the lion territories to keep them fed whilst the wildebeest are away. If you are after a great value safari, it is worth seeking the ‘off season’ camps as they will still have great opportunities to see lions and great prices!

A beautiful lionness in the morning light. Picture taken by Africa specialist Sam whilst in the Serengeti.

Cheetahs

Small, lithe and the only cat that can’t roar, you are often left feeling sorry for the cheetah. Often bullied by hyenas and the other cats, being a cheetah mother is probably one of the toughest jobs in the Serengeti. Even with the honey-badger disguise, cheetah cubs unfortunately have a very high mortality rate. But for all their bad luck, there is one place in the Serengeti that we hold close to our hearts. Recently reopened and what used to be a cheetah research area, Namiri Plains in the Eastern section of the Serengeti is a place like no other. As well as being home to numerous caracals, servals and other big cats, the cheetah population has thrived here for years and sightings are daily and wonderful. For the best cheetah sightings and photographic opportunities we couldn’t recommend Asilia’s Namiri Plains Camp high enough. If you don’t believe it yet, check out our Instagram to see our first-hand sightings from our trips there!

Two cheetah brothers photographed by Managing Director Marc on his stay at Namiri Plains.

Elephants

The most intelligent of all savannah animals, with communication systems that humans haven’t been able to apprehend and emotions that no other animals seem to have, the elephant is a magnificent creature. The biggest member of the Big 5, yet also the most gentle, one would be mistaken that they are big fumbling, bumbling balls of grey, yet an insight into their behaviour shows just how gentle and nimble they can be. That’s not to say they aren’t destructive because they certainly can be when the mood strikes. With the Serengeti being such an open and vast landscape, elephants are not normally found in such open areas, that’s why it is important to be in a camp that is placed perfectly for both habitats. A great area for elephant sightings is in the often-forgotten Serengeti forests. Here the vegetation is denser and riverine thickets are the perfect habitat for elephant families who need plenty of food, water and shelter to provide safety for the herd.  We absolutely love Nomad’s Serengeti Safari Camp, a mobile camp which moves throughout the year depending on where the migration is, yet their location also takes into consideration the movement of the mega fauna like the elephants. Their new position by the Moru kopjes in central Serengeti provides the perfect setting for great sightings.

The often forgotten forests of the Serengeti photographed by Africa specialist Sam whilst staying in the Moru region.

Whilst I hope you will enjoy the rest of the series, I know I plan to, if you want to experience the Serengeti with your own eyes then there is only one thing for you to do: contact us! We would love help you book the trip of a lifetime.

July 26, 2016

The Cycle of Life in the Serengeti

the-fight-serengeti-bjorn-persson

When the wildebeest migration arrives on the plains of the Serengeti, a time of plenty begins for the predators. It’s basically a big moving ‘all you can eat’ buffet and the drama that unfolds during this time makes for some of the best wildlife sightings. It’s no wonder that this spectacle is on so many safari enthusiasts bucket lists!

“The survival tactics, the perfectly timed executions and the unexpected escapes are bound to leave any wildlife lover enthralled. However, a certain degree of empathy is also stirred from observing wild animals in their quest for survival, and the raw simplicity of life in the bush is an alluring aspect for many visitors. There are also many lessons to be learnt from the animal kingdom – from trusting instincts and embracing strengths, to working as a team and adapting in the face of adversity.”Africa Geographic describes the migration in a gallery titled ‘Life and Death in the Serengeti’ featuring a series of powerful images captured by wildlife photographer, Björn Persson.

Here are a few on the photographs that were featured:

first-steps-serengeti-bjorn-persson

Entering the world as baby wildebeest, odds for survival aren’t great. With predators around every corner, a weak little wildebeest is an easy target. Getting on their feet and walking as soon as possible is their only chance of survival.

lion-buffet-serengeti-bjorn-persson

When the calving season arrives, the big cats feast in the Serengeti! During this time, it is vital that they gain weight and store energy for the future when easy meals might not be as abundant.

last-breath-serengeti-bjorn-persson

Built for speed, cheetahs have the option of targeting prey that would be more difficult for the other predators to catch. Once they have caught their prey, cheetahs need time to rest but they also have to eat their meal relatively quickly as larger predators often chase the cheetahs off their kill and steal it for themselves.

the-feast-serengeti-bjorn-persson

Unlike cheetahs, lions cannot rely on their speed to make a kill and need to carefully stalk their prey until it’s the right time to pounce. Often taking advantage of the cover of darkness, lions usually hunt in groups to increase their chances of success.

Click here to see the rest of the gallery.

If this sounds like your kind of safari experience, then get in touch with us! We consider ourselves to be somewhat ‘experts’ on the topic and can help you plan the best safari possible in the heart of the Great Wildebeest Migration.

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